Please find below the 17 Images for you to vote on, pick the image you think should be the People’s Choice Winner and cast your vote using the link below.

 

1: Annie Xu – College of Arts, School of Fine and Performing Arts

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To be Continued …

My PhD project is Text and Art Collision with Contemporary Chinese Art. This is a curatorial practice-led research, relates to the fields of contemporary philosophy, contemporary thinking of art, contemporary literary theories, contemporary Chinese art, and contemporary curation.

This image is a poster I designed for my next curatorial project To Be continued…, which will be exhibited in China at April 2017. The ink calligraphy of a capital C is the initial letter of the words related to my research — contemporary, conception, currents, context, culture, continuous, content, condition, curation, communication, China, consequence, etc. Interweaved lines is a metaphor of signifying chains that transvers the arts along the texts in the framework of arts and textualities/meanings that interpreted by audience/reader under certain contexts.

The purpose of contemporary curation is to exhibit contemporaneity in art, on both spatial and temporal, limitless and boundless, with flow and currents of world context.


 

2. Cheng Hu – College of Science, School of Computer Science

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Swarm of Robots with Vision

Inspired from the complex behaviour observed in social insects like bees and ants, swarm robotics has been studied on how multiple autonomous robots could achieve collective tasks, such as aggregation and pattern forming. Up to 15 Colias robots, which belong to the novel micro-robot platform designed by the Computational Intelligence Laboratory (CIL) in University of Lincoln, have been deployed in experiments to study the aggregation behaviour, while each robot uses vision as the only sensing method to explore the environment, and adapts its own behaviour according to the light condition of the surroundings. This research could bring us a clearer understanding on how environment change mediates the collective behaviour, which is important in both robotics and biological fields.


 

3. Laura Martinez Ingio – College of Social Sciences, School of Psychology

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Uye, the alpha of Pantai Batu

The picture shows an adult male of crested macaque (Macaca nigra), species only found in the North of Sulawesi (Indonesia). Crested macaques live in cohesive groups of several tens of individuals of different sexes and ages. Different groups compete for access to resources such as food. When groups encounter, the meeting might end up with one chasing the other if violence doesn’t escalate to higher levels.

This male is called Uye, the alpha male of one of the study groups of my PhD. In this species, alpha males have preferential access to food and partners and father almost all the babies in their group during the years they hold the position. They are usually one of most active participants during encounters between groups. My PhD looks at the factors that influence the outcome and development of these encounters and how these events affect the social behaviours within the groups. My research was possible thanks to the Macaca Nigra Project.


 

4. Laura Martinez Ingio – College of Social Sciences, School of Psychology

Battle prisoner

Battle Prisoner

The picture shows a juvenile crested macaque (Macaca nigra), species only found in North Sulawesi (Indonesia). Crested macaques live in cohesive groups of several tens of individuals of different sexes and ages. Different groups compete for access to resources such as food. When groups encounter, the meeting might end up with one chasing the other if violence doesn’t escalate to higher levels.

This juvenile was isolated from its group during an encounter and was fiercely attacked by the other group. In this picture, we see it between the attacks that the members of the other group were subjecting it to. In the end, it managed to escape and went back to its group. My PhD looks at the factors that influence the outcome and development of these encounters and how these events affect the social behaviours within the groups. My research was possible thanks to the Macaca Nigra Project.


 

5. Laura Martinez Ingio – College of Social Sciences, School of Psychology

Cherry

Cherry

The picture shows an adult female crested macaque (Macaca nigra) with her baby. This species is only found in the North of Sulawesi (Indonesia). Crested macaques live in cohesive groups of several tens of individuals of different sexes and ages. Different groups compete for access to resources such as food. When groups encounter, the meeting might end up with one chasing the other if violence doesn’t escalate to higher levels.

This female is called Cherry. She used to try to be friendly with females of other groups during the encounters, but the males of her own group chased her away. Once she had the baby, the males tended to be more relaxed and she could make friends with the neighbours more easily. My PhD looks at the factors that influence the outcome and development of these encounters and how these events affect the social behaviours within the groups. My research was possible thanks to the Macaca Nigra Project.


 

6. Laura Martinez Ingio – College of Social Sciences, School of Psychology

Eko

Eko

The picture shows a young adult male of crested macaque (Macaca nigra), species only found in the North of Sulawesi (Indonesia). Crested macaques live in cohesive groups of several tens of individuals of different sexes and ages. Different groups compete for access to resources such as food. When groups encounter, the meeting might end up with one chasing the other if violence doesn’t escalate to higher levels.

This male is called Eko. He was born in PB1 and when I started my field work, he was still a sub-adult due to migrate to another group. Sub-adults are usually very involved in encounters, perhaps because this gives them a chance to evaluate the other group and see if is a good one to migrate to. My PhD looks at the factors that influence the outcome and development of these encounters and how these events affect the social behaviours within the groups. My research was possible thanks to the Macaca Nigra Project.


7. Laura Martinez Ingio – College of Social Sciences, School of Psychology

Grooming

Grooming

The picture shows a two adult females of crested macaque (Macaca nigra) and the baby of one of them. This species is only found in the North of Sulawesi (Indonesia). Crested macaques live in cohesive groups of several tens of individuals of different sexes and ages. Different groups compete for access to resources such as food. When groups encounter, the meeting might end up with one chasing the other if violence doesn’t escalate to higher levels.

The female with the baby is called Xilem, and the one grooming her is Queen. It is thought that conflicts between groups may foster cooperative and friendly behaviours (such as grooming) within groups. Part of my PhD looks at whether this hypothesis is supported by the data I collected on crested macaques. This may help to understand the evolution of cooperation in humans and other animals. My research was possible thanks to the Macaca Nigra Project.


 

8. Laura Martinez Ingio – College of Social Sciences, School of Psychology

Mr.I

Mr.I, a sub-adult of Pantai Batu

The picture shows a sub-adult male of crested macaque (Macaca nigra), species only found in the North of Sulawesi (Indonesia). Crested macaques live in cohesive groups of several tens of individuals of different sexes and ages. Different groups compete for access to resources such as food. When groups encounter, the meeting might end up with one chasing the other if violence doesn’t escalate to higher levels.

This male is called Mr.I. He was born in PB1 and when I started my field work, he was still a sub-adult due to migrate to another group. Sub-adults are usually very involved in encounters, perhaps because this gives them a chance to evaluate the other group and see if is a good one to migrate to. My PhD looks at the factors that influence the outcome and development of these encounters and how these events affect the social behaviours within the groups. My research was possible thanks to the Macaca Nigra Project.


 

9. Laura Martinez Ingio – College of Social Sciences, School of Psychology

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Papaya’s baby

The picture shows an infant of crested macaque (Macaca nigra) with its mother. This species is only found in the North of Sulawesi (Indonesia). Crested macaques live in cohesive groups of several tens of individuals of different sexes and ages. Groups compete for access to resources such as food. When groups encounter, they may end up chasing each other if violence doesn’t escalate to higher levels.

The female is called Papaya. Females with babies are often curious during encounters, peering the neighbours from as close as they can. However, they usually retreat when things start to get violent. Given that infants can be easily injured and even killed during encounters, is understandable that mothers prefer to leave the fighting to other group members while they retreat with their babies. My PhD looks at the factors that influence the outcome and development of encounters between groups and how these events affect the social behaviours within groups. My research was possible thanks to the Macaca Nigra Project.


10. Laura Martinez Ingio – College of Social Sciences, School of Psychology

Hanna

Hanna

The picture shows an adult female of crested macaque (Macaca nigra). This species is only found in North of Sulawesi (Indonesia) and lives in cohesive groups of several tens of individuals of different sexes and ages. Groups compete for access to resources such as food. When groups encounter, they may end up chasing each other, if violence doesn’t escalate to higher levels.

This female is called Hanna. While some females almost never approach other groups during encounters, others can be very curious. However, they need to be careful, since the males of their own group may attack them if they see them close to the neighbours. If females manage to interact with the other group though, they can either be very friendly or very aggressive…sometimes both during the same encounter, for the total confusion of the researchers. My PhD looks at the factors that influence the outcome and development of encounters between groups among other topics. My research was possible thanks to the Macaca Nigra Project.


11. Leah Warriner-Wood – College of Arts, School of History & Heritage

Tree of Knowledge TIFF Leah Wood 2

Tree of Knowledge

This image shows the view from beneath the canopy of a tree in the grounds of Lincoln Castle. On a late Summer day in 2016 I found myself under this tree, spending a peaceful few hours reading a book on one of my PhD case studies. Trees have long been used as metaphors for growth – growth of body, growth of self, and growth of knowledge.

This tree symbolises, to me, that knowledge is not only grown in laboratories, universities, libraries, or offices: as a researcher you study the world, but the world is your Study.


12. Leah Warriner-Wood – College of Arts, School of History & Heritage

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View from the Office

This image shows a view across the Drawing Room at Doddington Hall, near Lincoln. The tapestry on a conservation frame in the foreground depicts the mythical ‘Trojan Horse’. This tapestry, and its fellows, are undergoing extensive conservation, having been taken down from the walls for the first time in over 250 years during 2014. Once conserved, the tapestries will go on public display, with new interpretation based on my research findings revealing their secrets to the public for the very first time.

My research focuses on tapestries in the eighteenth-century country house and their contribution to a sense of identity among landowners. It has involved working as part of the conservation team to allow the tapestries to tell their stories, thread by thread. The team’s work is watched over by eighteenth-century landowner John Hussey Delaval, who had the tapestries hung, and who looks on from a portrait in the distance.


 

 13. Lora Altahrawi – College of Science, School of Pharmacy

Lora Altahrawi

Research is Fun

In the future, by virtue of geography or as the consequence of operating in a post petroleum independent economy for chemical manufacture; an increasing demand for natural product therapeutics as alternatives to synthetic drugs will emerge. Many of these plants derived active pharmaceutical ingredients are water insoluble.  One way forward is to explore the use of cocrystals. Cocrystallization is the process of forming molecular interactions between two or more compounds to enhance their physiochemical properties, most importantly, solubility and stability.

In this research, curcumin, a yellow compound extracted from turmeric an Indian food spice is used. curcumin has many astonishing therapeutic effects like, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antioxidant, antiaging, etc. Nevertheless, its poor water solubility hinders its formulation into a suitable pharmaceutical preparation. The purpose of the project is to cocrystallize curcumin with an excipient to produce cocrystals of superior solubility that are amenable for further processing into acceptable pharmaceutical dosage form.


 

14. Mel Tombs – College of Science , School of Pharmacy

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 Pipette to patient: Diabetes research

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells which leads to maintained elevated blood glucose and ketoacidosis. Patient blood samples have been studied however little is known about the autoimmune response within the pancreatic islets and this research aims to reveal information at site of disease. Laboratory techniques are used to extract RNA from archival T1D pancreas tissue, amplify antibody binding variable regions (AbV) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequence AbV and express the antibody fragments to analyse their binding to a panel of β-cell antigens. The image shows PCR preparation including 0.2ml tubes and a 10ul pipette. Preliminary PCR results have shown feasibility of amplifying AbV from archival pancreas samples. Characterising phenotype and specificity of autoantibodies from the islets may be useful in understanding the autoimmune response at site of disease compared to the blood and for developing immunotherapies to block the destruction of β-cells.


 

15.  Oliver Cocks – College of Science, School of Life Sciences

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Callosobruchus maculatus parameres

This is a Scanning electron micrograph of part of the genital architecture of the male Callosobruchus maculatus bruchid. Their true function is still not understood but with my research we have been able to rule out several hypotheses as to their purpose. We found that their presence is not essential to successful copulation but significantly decreases a male’s ability to mate without them. We believe their true role is one of stimulation. The sensilla and setae present on the end (Far left) of the parameres brush against the females last sternite during mating. Whether this stimulation acts as a guide for the male or to stimulate the female into acceptation of copulation as a measure of male quality is still not known. This image shows the location of the parameres in relation to the Bruchid whilst mating, as well as comb like structures situated on the inside edge that have not previously been described in any relevant literature.


16.  Paolo Lucaioli  – College of Science, School of Pharmacy

P_20170203_114753_vHDR_On Paolo Lucaioli

Multicomponent crystals: let’s get together and feel all right

Multicomponent crystals are defined as crystals containing at least two different molecules held together by various types of intermolecular interactions. Crystal engineering is the science investigating these interactions in terms of crystal packing and its aim is the use of this knowledge to design new solid materials with specific properties.

Crystallisation (the process of crystal formation) is referred to as more of an art than a science: as in human everyday life, some compounds don’t like each other and it is difficult to make them collaborate. Crystal engineers try to find the right conditions and the right environment to bring different compounds to overcome their diversities and shake their hands. Many attempts may fail, but when the magic happens that’s what you can see: a colourful world with bubbles of excitement for the new successful relationships!

 


 

17.  Shreesha Bhatt  – College of Science, School of Chemistry

Chemistry on fumehood - Shreesha Bhatt

Chemistry on the fume-hood

Basically all the chemical reactions take place in a well-ventilated fume-hood, and a chemist spends most of his time around the fume-hood performing different reactions, purification of synthesised chemical compounds, as well as handling toxic chemicals.

Although the importance of chemistry IN the fume-hood is immense, this picture shows the chemistry ON the fume-hood. The glass panel on the fume-hood is a perfect platform to scribble reactions and discuss chemistry with lab-mates and supervisors. The importance of this can be easily missed, but it does play an important role in a chemist’s everyday life!

The People’s Choice vote will end on Friday 31st  March 2017 at 5PM